Catégorie

Politique de TIC

Review: Digital footprints of NDC’s 2020 manifesto

Par | Plaidoyer, Droits numériques, Politique de TIC, Liberté d'Internet

Ghana, one of Africa’s most stable democracies goes to the polls in December 2020 to elect a president and lawmakers. It is the eighth consecutive vote that has been held since return to multi-party democracy in 1992.

Electioneering has undoubtedly evolved over the years. One of the main assets of campaigns being manifestoes – the document based on which party aspirations are laid out and with which they are held accountable periodically.

The 2020 campaign is no different, with the two major parties having unveiled their manifestoes. The issues therein as usual span service and infrastructure delivery promises and governance ideas and visions.

As a 2020 Paradigm Initiative digital rights fellow, this writer zones in on the digital footprints of opposition National Democratic Congress, NDC; led by former president John Dramani Mahama. A subsequent review will look at the ruling New Patriotic Party, NPP’s digital plans, pledges and postures.

A digital start

Right from the get-go; the manifesto’s introduction message pledges “digital transformation,” whiles in his foreword candidate Mahama says: “we must build a knowledge-based economy and move faster into the new world of smart manufacturing and digital services.”

The word “digital” appears a total of 44 times in different contexts throughout the 143-page document dubbed “Jobs, prosperity and more – The People’s Manifesto.”

The areas of focus remained varied spanning the finance, education, health, creative arts, agriculture, the judiciary, government services, private sector and digital inclusion sectors of the economy.

The NDC touts its achievement in the digital space during the first term of the Mahama administration (2016 – 2020) whiles promising largely to increase investment and support for people operating in the digital ecosystem.

One of the major promises in the document falls under the $10m Big Push infrastructure agenda under which the NDC is promising to “develop regional digital and innovation centers.”

The digital zone of the NDC manifesto

Still under the Big Push umbrella, the NDC states its commitment to developing a digitally functional economy. “Undoubtedly digital infrastructure is the bedrock of every digital economy,” the party stressed.

“… the COVID-19 pandemic has exposed, not only the weaknesses in Ghana’s health system, but also its key deficiencies. These include gaps between the served and underserved on healthcare and delivery of other services.

“Ghana cannot be caught waiting. We must fully embrace digital technology but with efficiency, in order to build a knowledge-based economy.”

The highlight of the party’s “smart business, smart government services and infrastructure” vision includes the following:

  1. Build a national information highway
  2. Make access to the internet universal and affordable by 2024
  3. Create a digital economy development fund
  4. Develop a digital Ghana masterplan
  5. Ensure efficient transfer of digital technologies

Areas of legislation and data issues included in this section include the following:

  1. Enhance Ghana’s Cloud readiness to encourage core significant investments in and use of data centers …
  2. Enact and enforce a Critical National Infrastructure Act to regulate the laying of fibre, water pipes and electricity lines alongside road construction.
  3. Digitise and integrate diverse national databases to improve Government services and enhance customer satisfaction.
  4. Support indigenous research into ICT technology, improvement and innovation including automation, machine learning, artificial intelligence, robotics and big data …
  5. Strengthen the Data Protection Commission and the National Information Technology Agency, NITA.
  6. Encourage open government data sharing to make information available to citizens.

There is room for digital innovation and inclusion in the areas of next-generation social infrastructure, health, education and agriculture. The creative arts sector and the judiciary also get special mentions in the use of digital processes.

The cybercrimes slot

The section of cybersecurity rounds up the “digital zone” of the manifesto spelling out efforts the NDC will employ in the area of data protection and curbing of cyber related crimes.

The party stresses its resolve to develop cybersecurity policies to protect critical information infrastructure, promises strong protection regime for victims of cyber fraud. Setting up cybercrime units within the police service along with national and regional cyber labs.

The digital gospel has indeed hit home among major political stakeholders. The main opposition has given enough room for the gospel in its manifesto spanning infrastructure boost, digital inclusion and critically the burgeoning area of data protection.

The role of civil society and the media will be key in keeping the party – and government – on track if it eventually wins. “Civil society must track these promises and push politicians to implement as many of them as possible,” a digital rights activist told this writer.

As crucial as the digital space is, one wonders how many Ghanaians will vote on digital inclusion and other digital rights grounds. What is incontrovertible is the role of new media in the campaigns of respective parties. Game on, may the best man win.

 

The writer, Abdul Rahman Shaban Alfa, is a 2020 Paradigm Initiative Digital Rights and Inclusion Media Fellow. He is a digital journalist who writes on major digital rights trends across the continent.  

Balancing the competing rights of free speech and hate speech

Par | #PINternetFreedom, Droits numériques, Politique de TIC, Liberté d'Internet

In August, the Nigerian Government announced the increase of fines for hate speech by media houses from N500,000 to N5 million. The announcement was made by the Minister for Information and Culture, Alhaji Lai Mohammed, at the unveiling ceremony of the revised National Broadcasting Code by the National Broadcasting Commission (NBC) in Lagos.

The code amendment stirred controversy with Nigerians kicking against its provisions. Many claimed the amended code is another attempt to clamp down on freedom of speech and media since the November proposed hate speech bill, which prescribes death by hanging for any person found guilty of hate speech has been put on hold.

Paradigm Initiative’s Program Manager, Adeboye Adegoke, said the hate speech fine increment has a very huge implication for the civic space and even for journalistic work. He said the government through the fine is forcing Nigerians to self-censor and more importantly, using the media to censor Nigerians.

“Since it is the media platforms that get to be fined at the end of the day, they are naturally compelled to limit the thoughts that their guests, interviewees can share on critical national issues,” Adegoke said.

“What we have seen clearly is an attempt by the government to unilaterally decide what amounts to hate speech and use that as a weapon to targets critical voices in society.”

A lawyer Ayo Odenibokun said the recently increased hate speech fine is absolutely “ludicrous.”

“It is an attempt to subjugate and suppress the people’s right to freely express themselves,” Odenibokun said.

“It is quite unfortunate that such increment is done in an era where the minimum wage is N30,000 only.”

However, the Nigerian government is hell-bent on regulating citizens’ expression online and offline with determination to curb hate speech. In 2019, President Muhammadu Buhari, during his Independence Day speech vowed that his administration would take a “firm and decisive action” against promoters of hate speech and other divisive materials on the Internet. The minister of information while announcing the hate speech fine increment stated the amendments were necessitated to vest more regulatory powers in the NBC.

“If we the citizens of the federal republic of Nigeria or as citizens of the world rescind our rights to free speech, that would definitely cripple the meaningful development of our country,” publisher and social change advocate Khadijah Abdullahi -Iya said.

“How would great ideas be shared? Who would then critique the performance of the government and charge them to do better? All of these are necessary elements of a growing democracy.”

Some Nigerians have also argued that the government and regulators would arbitrarily define hate speech and use this new regulation to oppress press freedom and free speech.

This however is not farfetched because, despite the clamour to clampdown on hate speech, there is still no clear identification of what expression or commentary defines Hate speech.

“I think no one is certain about what the phrase ‘hate speech’ denotes,” Abdullahi-Iya said.

“I see it as one of those ambiguous words with fuzzy edges.”

The Nigeria police and State Security Service (SSS), have made regular arrests of journalists, bloggers, and social media commentators. Journalists like Agba Jalingo, have been detained or charged to court for writing articles or posts on social media criticising political officeholders.

“The government ought to look at the root cause of the various criticisms it receives and which are not far fetched i.e. lack of adequate and quality education, insecurity and poverty,” Onibokun said.

“Rather make laws which on the face of it offend the rights of its innocent citizens,” he added.
Adegoke also noted that if Nigeria is really interested in mitigating the effect of harmful speeches then the country must be willing to go through an open, inclusive, and collaborative process in arriving at the best solutions.

“All ongoing conversations are an attempt by the government to unilaterally decide what is acceptable speech and what is not,” Adegoke said

He also stated that once there is an agreement that citizens’ expression should be regulated, then the government would be taking away the constitutionally guaranteed right to freedom of expression.

“ While rights are not absolute. Any derogation to it as provided for by the constitution must be necessary, towards a legitimate end and must proportionate to that legitimate end,” Adegoke said.

Written by Abisola Olasupo – Paradigm Initiative’s Digital Rights and Inclusion Media Fellow.

Déclaration conjointe en réponse aux perturbations d’Internet en Guinée

Par | Plaidoyer, Droits numériques, Politique de TIC, Liberté d'Internet, Communiqué de presse

Déclaration conjointe en réponse aux perturbations d’Internet en Guinée

3 Novembre 2020

[See English translation after this text in French…]

Nous, les organisations soussignées, sommes préoccupées par les perturbations d’Internet en Guinée. En effet, le 24 octobre 2020, les réseaux de télécommunications en Guinée ont subi de graves perturbations. Selon l’observatoire d’Internet NetBlocks, «des perturbations sont observées au niveau national dans le service internet en Guinée depuis 7h30 (GMT) le (23 octobre 2020 ndlr), y compris sur Orange, premier réseau de téléphonie mobile du pays. Cet incident semble conforme aux restrictions imposées par le passé et assignées aux organes de contrôle de l’État lors des élections.” a rapporté Netblocks. Aussi, les perturbations mentionnées concernent l’internet et les appels internationaux en général.

Le 24 Octobre 2020, l’opérateur Orange a envoyé un message à ses abonnés sur la situation en s’excusant. Dans un communiqué de presse daté du 25 Octobre 2020, l’opérateur Orange a ensuite informé ses abonnés qu’il a enregistré une coupure d’internet. Nous nous rendons compte que ce n’est pas la première fois que la Guinée enregistre des perturbations d’Internet en 2020. Le 19 Mars 2020, Orange, MTN et Cellcom Guinée  ont averti leurs utilisateurs qu’un arrêt d’internet se produirait à une durée déterminée les 21 et 22 Mars 2020 pour une intervention de maintenance d’Orange Marine, une filiale de l’opérateur télécoms Orange. Cette annonce de la fermeture d’Internet et des travaux intervenait lors du référendum dans le pays, et était manifestement nuisible pour l’accès Internet des abonnés. 

Internet est essentiel pour la protection des droits de l’homme. Il fournit une plate-forme pour accéder à l’information, permet de jouir de la liberté d’expression, de réunion et d’association, entre autres droits. De plus, pendant la période de la pandémie du COVID-19, Internet a permis de faire l’expérience de l’éducation, des affaires et des loisirs; un rappel clair de l’importance de la liberté sur Internet. Nous appelons le gouvernement guinéen et les fournisseurs de services Internet à respecter les droits des citoyens d’accéder à Internet. Les interruptions d’Internet sont inutiles lorsqu’il n’y a pas de cause légitime. 

Nous sommes également préoccupés par la perturbation d’Internet qui s’est produite dans le contexte d’une élection présidentielle. Certaines des conséquences négatives sont une violation de la liberté d’expression, l’accès à l’information, les droits démocratiques et l’interruption des activités commerciales avec des répercussions financières en dehors du champ d’application des instruments régionaux et internationaux auxquels la Guinée est partie prenante. 

Nous rappelons au gouvernement de Guinée ses obligations en vertu du Pacte international relatif aux droits civils et politiques et de la Charte africaine des droits de l’homme et des peuples de respecter la liberté d’expression et l’accès à l’information. En outre, le Principe 38 (2) de la Déclaration de principes sur la liberté d’expression et l’accès à l’information en Afrique indique clairement que les États ne s’engagent ni ne tolèrent aucune interruption de l’accès à Internet et aux autres technologies numériques pour des segments du public ou une population entière. 

Nous interpellons le gouvernement guinéen sur les principes (2) de la Déclaration africaine sur les droits et libertés d’Internet qui stipule que l’accès à Internet doit être disponible et abordable pour toutes les personnes en Afrique sans discrimination pour quelque motif que ce soit comme la race, la couleur, le sexe, la langue, la religion, l’opinion politique ou autre, l’origine nationale ou sociale, la propriété, la naissance ou tout autre statut. La perturbation d’Internet a un impact important sur les groupes vulnérables tels que les femmes et les personnes handicapées (PH). Aussi, les effets de la fermeture d’Internet peuvent avoir des effets négatifs de grande portée sur la manière dont les femmes utilisent Internet par rapport aux hommes, l’accès des femmes aux programmes de développement, et sapent encore davantage le rôle des femmes dans la contribution au développement national.

Nous appelons le gouvernement guinéen à mener les actions suivantes:

  • Restaurer entièrement la connexion Internet, les accès aux plateformes de médias sociaux et d’assurer le respect des libertés fondamentales conformément aux meilleures pratiques. 
  • S’engager pour la stabilité de la connexion Internet sur tout le territoire national pendant et après le processus électoral afin qu’internet soit d’utiliser comme instrument de promotion de la démocratie en Guinée.

Signé:

  1. Centre de soutien juridique (Gambie)
  2. Give1Project Gambia 
  3. Paradigm Initiative (PIN)
  4. Women of Uganda Network (WOUGNET)
  5. Institut des TIC pour le développement (INTIC4DEV) Togo-Bénin-Sénégal
  6. BudgIT Foundation, Nigéria

Joint Statement In Response to the Internet Disruptions in Guinea

3 November 2020

We, the undersigned organisations are concerned about internet disruptions in Guinea. On October 24, 2020, telecommunications networks in Guinea experienced severe disruption. According to the internet observatory NetBlocks, “disruptions are observed at the national level in the internet service in Guinea since 7:30 am (GMT) on (October 23, 2020 editor’s note), including on Orange, the country’s leading mobile telephone network. This incident appears to be consistent with restrictions imposed in the past and assigned to state oversight bodies during elections.” As reported by Netblocks, the disturbances mentioned concern the internet and international calls in general.

On October 24, 2020, the operator Orange sent a message to its subscribers on the internet situation advising they were investigating the matter. In a press release dated on October 25, 2020, the operator then informed its subscribers that it was experiencing a shutdown. We realise that this was not the first time that Guinea was experiencing internet disruptions in 2020. On March 19, 2020, Orange, MTN and Cellcom Guinea  warned their users that an internet shutdown would occur at designated times on March 21 and 22, 2020 for a maintenance intervention by Orange Marine, the subsidiary of the telecoms operator Orange. This announcement of the closure of the internet and work occurring during the referendum was clearly untimely and detrimental to internet access of subscribers. 

The internet is critical for the protection of human rights. It provides a platform for accessing information, enjoyment of freedom of expression, assembly and association among other rights. Moreso, now during the COVID-19 pandemic, the internet has enabled education, business and leisure to be experienced, a clear reminder of the importance of internet freedom. We call on the government of Guinea and internet service providers to respect the rights of its citizenry to access the internet. Internet disruptions are unnecessary  where there is no legitimate cause.  We are further concerned by the internet disruption which occurred against the backdrop of a presidential election. Some of the  adverse consequences are a violation of freedom of expression, access to information, democratic rights and the interruption of business activities with financial repercussions outside the scope of the regional and international instruments to which Guinea is a party to. 

We remind the government of Guinea of its obligations under the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights to uphold freedom of expression and access to information. Furthermore, Principle 38 (2) of the Declaration of Principles on Freedom of Expression and Access to Information in Africa clearly points out that  States shall not engage in or condone any disruption of access to the internet and other digital technologies for segments of the public or an entire population. 

We refer the government of Guinea to principles (2) of the African Declaration on Internet Rights and Freedoms which states that access to the Internet should be available and affordable to all persons in Africa without discrimination on any ground such as race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status.  Internet disruption highly impacts vulnerable groups such as women and persons with disabilities (PWDs). The effects of internet shutdown may have far-reaching negative effects on how women use the internet compared to men, women’s access to developmental programs, and further undermines the role of women in contributing to national development.

We call on  the government of Guinea to immediately do the following;

  • Fully restore internet connection and access to social media platforms and ensure respect for fundamental freedoms in accordance  with best practices. 
  • Commit to the stability of the internet connection throughout the national territory during and after the electoral process in order to use the Internet as an instrument for promoting democracy in Guinea.

Signed:

  1. Centre for Legal Support (Gambia)
  2. Give1Project Gambia 
  3. Paradigm Initiative (PIN)
  4. Women of Uganda Network (WOUGNET)
  5. Institut des TIC pour le développement (INTIC4DEV) Togo-Bénin-Sénégal
  6. BudgIT Foundation, Nigeria

Appel à co-auteurs

Par | Plaidoyer, Droits numériques, DigitalJobs, Politique de TIC, TIC, Liberté d'Internet, LA VIE

Un rapport sur les droits numériques et l’inclusion en Afrique

Contexte

Paradigm Initiative (PIN) est une entreprise sociale qui construit un système de soutien basé sur les TIC et milite pour les droits numériques afin d’améliorer les moyens de subsistance des jeunes mal desservis. À travers ses équipes, partenaires et réseaux à travers le continent africain, PIN surveille l’état des droits numériques et de l’inclusion en Afrique et intervient avec des programmes et des actions qui répondent le mieux aux défis. L’écosystème numérique en Afrique est marqué par des violations des droits numériques que PIN a bien identifiées dans ses rapports sur les droits numériques en Afrique et a fait l’objet de délibérations mondiales sur des plateformes régionales et internationales telles que DRIF, le Forum sur la gouvernance de l’internet et RightsCon.

Grâce à la communauté des droits numériques et de l’inclusion, les initiatives de plaidoyer changent le paysage numérique en garantissant que les meilleures pratiques sont adoptées dans les politiques et la législation en Afrique. Des progrès significatifs sont en cours dans certains pays africains pour combler le fossé numérique et méritent d’être reconnus. Dans ce contexte, il est pertinent que le PIN documente les droits numériques et les violations d’inclusion, souligne les jalons et formule des recommandations pour améliorer le paysage numérique en Afrique.

Paradigm Initiative sollicite les services de chercheurs sur les droits numériques et l’inclusion en Afrique pour être co-auteurs d’un rapport continental annuel sur les droits numériques et l’inclusion. Chaque chercheur retenu fera rapport sur un pays spécifique. Paradigm Initiative versera une allocation de 800 USD au chercheur pour un travail achevé et soumis de manière satisfaisante.

Justification et portée du rapport

PIN cherche à compiler le rapport annuel 2020 qui donne une analyse approfondie de l’état des droits numériques et de l’inclusion en Afrique en examinant les violations, les lacunes, en enquêtant sur l’utilisation et l’application des politiques et de la législation, ainsi qu’en formulant des recommandations clés pour faire progresser les droits numériques et l’inclusion en Afrique. Le rapport dégagera également des thèmes clés à débattre lors du prochain DRIF21 et mettra en évidence les domaines d’intervention exceptionnels.

Méthodologie

Le rapport comprendra des rapports spécifiques aux pays bien documentés qui sont référencés et soumis par les auteurs des membres de son équipe et de la communauté des droits numériques et de l’inclusion. L’étude des pays adoptera une approche multiforme, combinant des méthodes empiriques et de recherche documentaire pour évaluer à la fois les aspects quantitatifs et qualitatifs des droits numériques et de l’inclusion en Afrique.

Contenu attendu

Les rapports nationaux doivent inclure un contexte et un historique; identifier et discuter des domaines d’évaluation thématiques, se référer à tout cadre juridique, politique et institutionnel du pays et faire des recommandations. Les rapports nationaux peuvent inclure, sans s’y limiter, l’un des domaines d’évaluation thématique suivants;

  • Impact de la réglementation COVID-19 sur les droits numériques et l’inclusion.
  • Jouissance de la liberté d’expression en ligne en 2020
  • Protection des données, confidentialité, identifiants numériques et surveillance
  • Coupures d’Internet
  • Lois sur le discours haineux, la désinformation et la diffamation criminelle
  • L’exclusion numérique en Afrique et son impact sur les droits humains
  • Infrastructure numérique et hiérarchisation des TIC.

Expertise et qualification requises

  • Bonne connaissance du pays sur lequel portera le rapport ;
  • Un diplôme pertinent.
  • Expertise, connaissances et expérience des droits numériques et de l’inclusion.
  • Ligne directrice pour les articles
  • Longueur acceptable du rapport de pays : 1500 mots
  • Anglais ou français.
  • Les auteurs doivent s’assurer que tous les statistiques, faits et données sont correctement référencés.
  • Un seul rapport de pays par chercheur sera accepté.

Les candidats intéressés, veuillez soumettre une réponse accompagnée d’une copie de votre CV et d’un échantillon de travail écrit d’ici le 19 septembre 2020 ici. Les délais complets seront communiqués aux candidats retenus. Les réponses seront communiquées le 1er octobre 2020.

Call for Co-Authors

Par | Plaidoyer, Droits numériques, DigitalJobs, Politique de TIC, TIC, Liberté d'Internet, LA VIE

A Report on Digital Rights and Inclusion in Africa

Background

Paradigm Initiative (PIN) is a social enterprise that builds an ICT-enabled support system and advocates for digital rights in order to improve livelihoods for under-served youth. Through its teams, partners and networks across the African continent, PIN monitors the state of digital rights and inclusion in Africa and intervenes with programs and actions that best respond to the challenges.  The digital ecosystem in Africa is marked by digital rights violations which PIN has aptly captured in its Digital Rights in Africa reports as well as been subject for global deliberations at regional and international platforms such as DRIF, Internet Governance Forum, and RightsCon.

Through the digital rights and inclusion community, advocacy initiatives are changing the digital landscape ensuring best practices are adopted into policy and legislation in Africa. The meaningful strides being taken in some African countries to bridge the digital divide are worth acknowledging.  With this background, it is pertinent that PIN documents digital rights and inclusion violations, highlights milestones and makes recommendations for improving the digital landscape in Africa.

Paradigm Initiative seeks the services of researchers on digital rights and inclusion from within Africa to be co-authors of an annual continental report on digital rights and inclusion. Each successful researcher will report on a specific country. Paradigm Initiative will pay a stipend of USD $800 to the researcher for work satisfactorily completed and submitted.

Rationale and Scope of the report

PIN seeks to compile the 2020 annual report that gives an in-depth analysis of the state of digital rights and inclusion in Africa by examining violations, gaps, investigating the use and application of policy and legislation as well as draw key recommendations for advancing digital rights and inclusion in Africa. The report will also draw key themes for deliberation at the upcoming DRIF21 and highlight outstanding areas for intervention.

Methodology

The report will comprise of well-researched country specific reports which are referenced and submitted by authors from its team members and digital rights and inclusion community. The study of the countries will take a multifaceted approach, combining empirical and desk-research methods to assess both quantitative and qualitative aspects of digital rights and inclusion in Africa.

Expected Content

Country Reports must include a context and background; identify and discuss the thematic assessment areas, refer to any in-country legal, policy and institutional framework and make recommendations. The country reports may include and not limited to any of the following thematic assessment areas;

  • Impact of COVID-19 Regulations on digital rights and inclusion.
  • Enjoyment of Freedom of Expression online in 2020
  • Data Protection, Privacy, Digital IDs and Surveillance
  • Internet Shutdowns
  • Hate Speech, Misinformation and Criminal Defamation Laws
  • Digital exclusion in Africa and its impact on human rights
  • Digital infrastructure and prioritization of ICT.

 Required expertise and qualification

  • Good understanding of the country to be reported on;
  • A relevant degree qualification.
  • Expertise, knowledge, and experience in digital rights and inclusion.

Guideline for Articles

  • Acceptable Length of Country Report: 1500 words
  • English or French.
  • Authors to please ensure that all statistics, facts and data are properly referenced.
  • Only 1 country report per researcher will be accepted.

Interested candidates, kindly submit a response together with a copy of your resume and sample written work by 19 September 2020 ici. Full timelines will be communicated to successful candidates. Responses will be communicated on 1 October 2020.

Opportunity: Research & Project Internship – Abuja

Par | Droits numériques, DigitalJobs, Politique de TIC

Paradigm Initiative (PIN) is a non-profit social enterprise that builds ICT-enabled support systems for young people, in order to improve their livelihoods. Two of PIN’s programs focus on digital inclusion while the third focuses on digital rights advocacy. Paradigm Initiative’s digital rights advocacy program is focused on the development of public policy for internet freedom in key regions of Africa. Our policy advocacy efforts include media campaigns, coalition building, capacity building, research and report-writing.

We are looking for a smart and brilliant individual with strong skills in research and project management. This internship opportunity is for three (3) months and the suitable candidate will support Paradigm Initiative’s Digital Policy Programs team. Interested persons with experience/interest/qualification in digital/tech policy should apply. The selected candidate will be expected to be available full time throughout the three months.

What you will do

  • Support research on/around Digital Policies
  • Project management tasks: planning, organising, budgeting, logistics, and reports
  • Reporting
  • Engage Digital Policy Process
  • Represent the Senior Program Manager at Meetings/Webinars
  • Document digital rights violations
  • Administrative/Secretariat support for strategic litigation interventions at PIN
  • Other assigned tasks by reporting authorities

What you will need

  • A first degree in Law, Policy, Social Sciences, project management and other related fields of study
  • A background in research and project management
  • Flair for and experience in budgeting, writing, and reporting
  • A legal background will be an added advantage.

What you will get

  • Compensation commensurate with experience
  • Hazard allowance for remote work
  • Workplace experience and exposure to Africa’s Digital Policy Community
  • Acknowledgment for Research Contributions (i.e your contribution to the research you work on and contribute to will be duly referenced and acknowledged.)

For the purpose of gender balance, a female candidate will be preferred. Candidates should not be above 30 years old. You will report to the Senior Programs Manager.

NB: Paradigm Initiative teams are currently working remotely. However, if physical work resumes before the end of the internship, the selected individual will be required to report to Paradigm Initiative’s Abuja office daily.

Do not apply if:

  • You are currently employed
  • You are actively pursuing an academic qualification within the specified period
  • You are not an excellent writer, planner and time manager
  • You are not available for a full-time position

comment s'inscrire

Send a one-page statement of Interest and links to articles/reports/paper/essay you have written in the past, with your recent CV attached to hr@paradigmhq.org. The application closes on September 11, 2020, but the position will be filled as soon as we find the right fit. If you think you are the right fit, do not delay in sending in your application.

 

 

 

 

Policy Brief: Contextualizing the use of mobile data for COVID-19 surveillance in Nigeria

Par | Droits numériques, Politique de TIC

Lagos, Nigeria. – [June 17, 2020] – Paradigm Initiative, a pan-African social enterprise that advocates for digital rights and inclusion in Africa has released a Policy brief on Policy responses to the covid-19 Pandemic. 

The Policy brief titled, ‘’Contextualizing the use of mobile data for COVID-19 surveillance in Nigeria through the lens of legality, necessity and proportionality’’ analyzes the reported plans by the Nigerian government in cooperation with MTN the country’s largest telecommunications company to use mobile subscribers data in the aid of contact tracing for the coronavirus disease spread. 

Adeboye Adegoke, Program Manager Digital Rights at Paradigm Initiative, ‘’In light of the rapid spread of the coronavirus around the world, many governments adopted mobile technology enabled contact tracing in a bid to stem the disease spread. In the rush to implement these measures to stem the spread of the virus, human rights considerations were not uppermost in the mind of policy makers across the world’’.

Adeboro Odunlami, Legal Officer Paradigm Initiative added, ‘’The international human rights principles of legality, proportionality and legality are benchmarks with which we can assess whether certain steps taken by entities meet minimum human rights standards and are based on human rights considerations. Having assessed Nigeria’s proposed mobile contact tracing plans based on these principles, we clearly see that these plans were hatched without properly weighing these international human rights standards.

According to Bulanda Nkhowani, Program Officer Digital Rights, Southern Africa Paradigm Initiative, ‘’Indeed, this rush to implement mobile contact tracing without a conscious and deliberate effort to safeguard human rights is not unique to Nigeria. We see this trend replicated across Africa. This period presents a unique opportunity for organizations working on digital rights to remind the world that digital rights are indeed human rights. Policies and actions of government which have the capacity to limit human rights must be accessed according to the principles of legality, necessity and proportionality, and must also have the requisite oversight at the appropriate levels of government to forestall abuse’’.

<<<Download the Policy Brief here>>> 

 About Paradigm Initiative

Paradigm Initiative (PIN) is a social enterprise that builds ICT-enabled support systems and advocates for digital rights in order to improve the livelihoods of under-served young Africans. The organization’s digital inclusion programs include a digital readiness school for young people living in under-served communities (LIFE) and a software engineering school targeting high potential young Nigerians (Dufuna). Both programs have a deliberate focus to ensure equal participation for women and girls. The digital rights advocacy program is focused on the development of public policy for internet freedom in Africa, with offices in Abuja, Nigeria (covering the Anglophone West Africa region); Yaoundé, Cameroon (Central Africa); Nairobi, Kenya (East Africa) and Lusaka, Zambia (Southern Africa). Paradigm Initiative has worked in communities across Nigeria since 2007, and across Africa from 2017, building experience, community trust and an organizational culture that positions us as a leading social enterprise in ICT for Development and Digital Rights on the continent. Paradigm Initiative is also the convener of the Digital Rights and Inclusion Forum (DRIF), a pan-African bilingual Forum that has held annually since 2013. 

For any inquiries about this press release, please send an email media@paradigmhq.org

 

Mozambique: Challenges of Ensuring Privacy without Harming Essential Freedoms

Par | Droits numériques, Politique de TIC, Liberté d'Internet

In July 2019, Mozambique made amendments to the Penal Code (No. 35/2014, of 31 December) to protect Privacy. The new law criminalises all types of invasion of privacy using mobile phones and computers i.e. capturing, altering and publishing images, audios and videos without consent from the subjects recorded or photographed.

One could spend up to one (1) year in jail or face a fine, for breaking this law, particularly for invading the privacy of intimacy of family or sexual life. An offender could face an equal penalty for secretly observing or listening to persons in a private place or for disclosing details of the serious illness of another person.

This legislation comes after a young man filmed the scene of a car accident where victims lay strewn on the ground while others cried out for help. The author of the video ‘amusingly’ filmed this horrific scene, which angered a lot of Mozambicans.

Some activists have welcomed the new law as a timely and relevant measure to protect victims against the invasion of privacy especially on social networks and through electronic media. Also, activists are calling for sensitization on the new law so that people are aware of their parameters when it comes to sharing private information into the public domain, particularly which is not of public interest or with intent to slander or blackmail the victims.

On the contrary, other activists are wary of the legislation’s far-reaching consequences on Internet freedom, press freedom and freedom of expression in the country, which already has a press law, right to information law and an electronic transactions Act which penalises slander. While these laws already assure citizens the right to honour, good name, reputation and defence of image, the changes to the penal code highlight an attempt to stifle access to information and prevent further scrutiny of public figures, especially that the law was approved in a haste.

Mozambique has enjoyed a relatively good record with regard to freedom of expression and freedom of the media, however, the above report paints a picture of what most countries will continue to battle with, in the process of balancing privacy laws with free speech and press.

The increased uptake of digital technologies empowers everyone to capture, create and disseminate information, with or without the subject’s consent. Ordinary citizens on the other hand, have to battle striking a balance between what they put in the public domain through their daily activities and using  mobile phones while maintaining their privacy and managing how their information is used and shared.

What we should be more worried about, however, is giving greater power to governments to target journalists and push back on ‘unwanted content’, using privacy laws. In addition, we should worry about increasing their power to shield misconduct and corruption. A functional democracy allows for enhanced transparency and accountability of political figures, and individuals’ participation in the political process.

While others would argue that, more privacy leads to less openness, individuals have the right to creativity and self-expression, and information is a key driver of innovation and economic growth. 

Perhaps more work remains in sensitizing users on ethics and etiquettes that govern the use of social media and digital technologies, at the same time ensuring that privacy laws do not infringe on people’s right to information and speech, alongside, protecting the press from government intrusion, content regulation, and censorship.

It is however important for the freedom of expression community to be wary of the emergence of privacy-themed legislations that may become a tool to restrict freedom of expression. Such policies must have clear definitions of terms and must not punish expression under the guise of protecting privacy

As a new country added to Paradigm Initiative’s scope of work, we will continue to monitor how this development unfolds, as well as the state of press freedom and freedom of expression in Mozambique.

The author of this article, Bulanda Nkhowani, is Paradigm Initiative’s Digital Rights Program Officer for Southern Africa. 

Préparer l’Afrique pour la nouvelle décennie de l’AI

Par | Plaidoyer, Droits numériques, Politique de TIC

Lentement mais sûrement, les pays d’Afrique ont commencé à se préparer à la quatrième révolution industrielle où les progrès de l’intelligence artificielle, de l’automatisation, de l’internet des objets (IoT), du cloud computing, de la robotique, de l’impression 3D, des nanotechnologies et des technologies sans fil avancées vont radicalement changer notre façon de vivre, de travailler et de gouverner nos sociétés.

L’intelligence artificielle a fait une percée significative en Afrique notamment  avec des start-ups et d’autres institutions axées sur l’intelligence artificielle qui commencent à avoir un impact sur l’économie, la vie sociale et la gouvernance. Les gouvernements de certains  pays comme le Ghana, le Nigeria, le Kenya, la Tunisie et l’Afrique du Sud ont soutenu le développement de l’IA par un soutien financier à la recherche et par la promotion de l’enseignement des STIM (science, technologie, ingénierie et mathématiques). Cela a permis à ces pays de réaliser les progrès les plus significatifs en matière d’intelligence artificielle en Afrique.

Néanmoins, seuls quelques pays comme le Kenya et la Tunisie disposent de stratégies nationales d’intelligence artificielle qui peuvent contribuer à l’intégration de l’intelligence artificielle au sein du gouvernement et des services publics.

Cependant, pour que l’IA – une technologie fondamentale de la quatrième révolution industrielle – ait un impact optimal en Afrique, des changements structurels radicaux doivent avoir lieu dans les différents contextes nationaux du continent. J’en explorerai les trois aspects ci-dessous.

Infrastructure de données

Les applications d’intelligence artificielle qui résolvent des problèmes pratiques acquièrent leur “intelligence” en apprenant à partir de très grands ensembles de données. Par exemple, les modèles d’IA construits pour la reconnaissance faciale ont été alimentés par de très grands ensembles de données comprenant des milliers de visages humains afin d’être formés sur ce qui constitue un visage humain.

De ce fait, les sociétés et les organisations disposant d’écosystèmes de capture, de stockage et de traitement des données très développés sont mieux placées pour bénéficier de manière optimale des progrès de l’IA.

Cela place l’Afrique dans une position désavantageuse car, comme la plupart des pays du Sud, l’Afrique est pauvre en données. En Afrique ,et plus particulièrement en Afrique subsaharienne, la collecte de données publiques, les enquêtes auprès des ménages et des entreprises, la collecte de données par le biais de systèmes administratifs tels que les registres de naissance, les pensions, les dossiers fiscaux, la santé et le recensement sont peu fréquentes et manquent souvent de granularité pour être exploitées avec précision.

Et lorsque certaines données existent, elles ne sont souvent numérisées pour être exploitées immédiatement par des applications d’IA. Par conséquent, dans le secteur public où les applications d’IA auraient pu être appliquées pour booster le développement sur le continent, l’infrastructure de données est malheureusement inexistante ou gravement inadéquate.

Pour montrer ce qui est possible dans un écosystème de données bien développé, les services de Santé du Royaume-Uni ont collaboré avec Google pour faire mettre en place un dispositif basé sur l’IA et qui permet la détection rapide de cancers. Ce dispositif permet d’avoir des données sur les patients au sein du système.

Il n’est donc pas surprenant que certaines des applications d’IA les plus prometteuses en Afrique soient presque entièrement pilotées par le secteur privé. Les organisations du secteur privé en Afrique disposent généralement de données qui sont collectées à des fins économiques, avec une fréquence élevée et avec un niveau de granularité plus élevé.

Il s’agit notamment de données provenant de téléphones portables, de transactions électroniques, de médias sociaux, d’applications de santé et de remise en forme, ainsi que des données provenant des satellites. Ces données ont permis de développer des applications d’IA telles que les chatbots et les assistants virtuels.

Pour que l’Afrique puisse exploiter pleinement le potentiel de son économie émergente en matière d’IA, la prochaine décennie doit être axée sur le développement des écosystèmes de données publiques, et éventuellement sur leur intégration au secteur privé de manière à stimuler le développement et à protéger les droits de l’homme.

Emploi et mutations économiques

Image result for africa startups

Les experts ne sont pas unanimes sur les effets de l’IA et de l’automatisation sur l’avenir du travail au niveau mondial. Il existe une école de pensée qui affirme que les gains de productivité résultant des progrès de l’IA dans tous les secteurs économiques compenseront les pertes d’emploi initiales causées par l’IA et l’automatisation.

D’autres éminents leaders d’opinion décrivent des perspectives plus sombres pour l’avenir de l’emploi et du travail. Cependant, ils s’accordent tous sur l’effet considérable que les progrès de l’intelligence artificielle et de l’automatisation auront sur l’avenir de l’emploi en Afrique, par rapport à d’autres régions du monde.

L’Afrique subsaharienne est déjà la région la plus jeune du monde, avec plus de 60 % de sa population âgée de moins de 25 ans. D’ici 2030, le continent abritera plus d’un quart de la population mondiale des moins de 25 ans. Cette explosion démographique augmentera la taille de la main-d’œuvre dans la région plus que dans le reste du monde. Néanmoins, les données du Forum économique mondial révèlent que les pays africains sont très vulnérables aux délocalisations  d’emplois provoquées par l’IA et l’automatisation. Les statistiques ci-dessous illustrent cette vulnérabilité :

  • L’Afrique subsaharienne affiche une part d’emplois hautement qualifiés de seulement 6 %, ce qui contraste avec la moyenne mondiale de 24 %. L’Afrique du Sud, l’île Maurice et le Botswana sont en tête pour la disponibilité locale d’emplois hautement qualifiés, tandis que d’autres, comme l’Éthiopie et le Nigeria, maintiennent une forte proportion de travailleurs dans des emplois moins qualifiés – qui sont plus susceptibles d’être automatisés.
  • D’un point de vue technologique, 41% de toutes les activités professionnelles en Afrique du Sud sont susceptibles d’être automatisées, tout comme 44% en Éthiopie, 46% au Nigeria, 48% à Maurice, 52% au Kenya et 53% en Angola.

Compte tenu de la vulnérabilité de l’Afrique aux déplacements massifs d’emplois qui pourraient être provoqués par l’IA et l’automatisation, des mesures urgentes doivent être prises pour mettre en œuvre une révision ascendante des programmes scolaires dans toute l’Afrique.

Plus que jamais, la participation et la contribution de l’industrie sont nécessaires pour remodeler l’apprentissage et l’instruction dans les établissements d’enseignement afin de préparer une main-d’œuvre à l’évolution rapide du travail du XXIe siècle.

Ce qui a été observé jusqu’à présent ressemble davantage à une approche du haut vers le bas largement dirigée par le secteur privé, avec la création de centres de recherche sur l’IA à travers l’Afrique par les géants mondiaux de la technologie.

Google a ouvert son laboratoire d’IA à Accra en avril 2019, et l’Institut africain des sciences mathématiques a été créé à Kigali au Rwanda en 2016 pour fournir une main-d’œuvre de haut niveau en IA et en machine Learning  pour l’Afrique. Une approche ascendante plus délibérée exigera des gouvernements qu’ils élaborent des politiques qui répondent à la nature changeante de l’emploi sur le continent, en fixant un programme pour les décennies à venir.

La mise en œuvre de cette politique pourrait impliquer des mesures tactiques telles que l’investissement accru dans l’enseignement des STIM dès le niveau primaire ou secondaire. Néanmoins, toute action doit découler d’une politique délibérée qui guide les efforts du gouvernement, plutôt que de réponses gouvernementales non coordonnées et impulsives au problème.

Droits de l’homme et responsabilité

Related image

Partout dans le monde, l’évolution de l’AI n’ pas tenu compte des considérations relatives aux droits de l’homme. Ce n’est que tardivement que les entreprises à l’avant-garde du développement de l’AI ont sérieusement réfléchi aux droits de l’homme et à la responsabilité dans la mise en œuvre des systèmes d’IA, souvent en réponse à la pression de la société civile.

Tant par leur conception que par leur fonction, les systèmes d’IA peuvent nuire aux droits de l’homme. Je parlerai ici de deux domaines dans le contexte africain où les systèmes d’IA peuvent nuire le plus aux droits de l’homme.

Les violations de la confidentialité des données sont parmi les plus importantes façons dont les systèmes d’IA peuvent être utilisés pour porter atteinte aux droits de l’homme.

En Afrique, où seuls 23 pays environ disposent de lois sur la protection des données, et encore moins d’institution de protection des données, il est facile de voir le potentiel d’abus de la confidentialité des données pour les applications d’IA qui utilisent les données personnelles des citoyens, notamment les informations financières et de santé.

Le déploiement de la technologie de reconnaissance faciale dans les grandes villes du continent constitue un autre débouché pour les violations des droits de l’homme.

En réponse à un rapport du Wall Street Journal qui affirmait que les techniciens de Huawei avaient aidé les responsables des services de renseignement en Ouganda à espionner leurs opposants politiques, la police ougandaise a confirmé que la société technologique Huawei déploie un système de surveillance massif qui utilise la reconnaissance faciale et d’autres logiciels d’intelligence artificielle pour lutter contre la criminalité dans le pays.

Les opposants Ougandais  craignent que cette capacité puisse être utilisée pour identifier et cibler les manifestants et les leaders de l’opposition avant les élections de 2021. De même, en avril 2018, la société chinoise CloudWalk a signé un accord avec le gouvernement du Zimbabwe pour aider à construire un système de reconnaissance faciale de masse.

Le système de reconnaissance faciale d’IA utilisé dans la capitale ougandaise fait partie de l’initiative “Safe City” de Huawei. Cette technologie est déjà répliquée ou le sera bientôt au Kenya, au Botswana, à l’île Maurice et en Zambie. Si le déploiement de telles technologies peut être utile pour réduire la criminalité, elles pourraient également devenir des instruments d’oppression aux mains de régimes répressifs.

À l’échelle mondiale, on observe également une adoption croissante des applications de l’IA pour le recrutement de ressources humaines, l’évaluation des crédits et même l’administration de la justice pénale. Ces rôles décisionnels critiques, qui étaient autrefois l’apanage des humains, ont des conséquences énormes pour les personnes concernées par les décisions.

La plus grande préoccupation liée au déploiement de ces systèmes est le biais inhérent aux algorithmes qui sous-tendent l’IA.  Ces algorithmes sont généralement formés avec des données qui excluent les membres d’une population. Cela conduit à des décisions et des résultats qui exacerbent encore la marginalisation.

Un exemple très connu est celui des rapports de 2019 qui suggéraient que la carte Apple, une carte de crédit créée par Apple et développée par Goldman Sachs, était apparemment biaisée contre les femmes en leur donnant des limites de crédit moins favorables que celles des hommes. Une autre préoccupation est l’opacité qui entoure ces systèmes d’IA.

Citant des secrets commerciaux ou la confidentialité des brevets, les propriétaires de ces systèmes d’IA sont réticents à partager le code source qui alimente ces algorithmes. Avant que ces systèmes ou leurs variantes ne soient largement adoptés en Afrique, des politiques de protection des droits de l’homme doivent être mises en place pour protéger les personnes vulnérables et marginalisées.

Pour bénéficier de l’AI, l’Afrique doit consolider les acquis des 2e et 3e révolutions industrielles

Image result for artificial intelligence facial

Davantage de pays africains doivent se joindre à des pays comme le Kenya et la Tunisie pour mettre en place des politiques nationales sur l’IA afin de coordonner les efforts nationaux en faveur du développement de l’intelligence artificielle.

Il faudra également consolider le paysage politique autour de l’infrastructure des données, des compétences numériques et de la protection des droits de l’homme. Cela permettra à l’Afrique de bénéficier des avancées de la 4e révolution industrielle qui, il faut le reconnaître n’est qu’une continuité des 2e et 3e révolutions industrielles.

Les pays qui ont le plus bénéficié des 4e révolutions  jusqu’à présent sont ceux qui ont continuellement investi et amélioré les infrastructures de base qui sous-tendent les 2e et 3e révolution (une électricité stable, des transports de masse efficaces, un accès au haut débit, etc.)

À l’heure actuelle, l’approvisionnement en électricité et l’accès à Internet en Afrique sont inexistants pour de larges segments de la population, ou insuffisamment fournis lorsqu’ils existent. Sans accès aux infrastructures de base, comme l’électricité et le haut débit, le développement des 4e Révolution Industrielle en Afrique sera entravé.

Cependant, avec des investissements continus dans ces secteurs ainsi que les nouvelles technologies comme l’IA, l’Afrique pourrait tout aussi bien prendre un virage et entamer un nouveau chapitre de développement qu’elle n’a –jusqu’ici- jamais connu.

L’auteur de l’article, Babatunde Okunoye est chercheur chez Paradigm Initiative.

 

 

Kenya’s Huduma Namba: What’s Next?

Par | Droits numériques, Politique de TIC

On the 30th of January 2020 a three-judge panel of Kenya’s High Court gave out their verdict on the validity of the implementation of the National Integrated Identity Management System (NIIMS), also known as Huduma Namba. Since the inception, Huduma Namba roll out last year concerns were raised by various actors on its effect on human rights.

Despite cry outs from the masses, Huduma Namba was rolled out and citizens were sensitized to enroll out of fear of losing out on access to key services. Passports were not the only thing that residents would miss out on if they lacked the special ID, access to services such as banks and education would be a no-go as well.

While the uproar stalled the rollout for a while, a coalition of stakeholders from the Nubian Forum, Kenya National Human Rights Commission and the Kenya Human Rights Commission, filed a case against the implementation of NIMS. This pressured the parliament to draft the Huduma Namba bill which faced a lot of criticism with the majority claiming it to be inadequate, ambiguous and “too late to the party”.This stretches from the components it poses all the way to the fact that it has been rushed at the same time as the Data protection and privacy policy was still underway proving once again that for most countries “the law does lag behind technology”.

On the court ruling on the 30th of January the court has halted the implementation of Huduma Namba in a 500-page judgment highlighting the following:

  • The legal framework on data privacy is “inadequate and totally wanting” hence it can only be a result of a rushed process that did not fully take into account how data will be protected.
  • The collection of DNA and GPS were declared unconstitutional and hence the court ordered that they be struck out of the NIIMS data to be collected
  • NIIMS is not inclusive of a lot of groups who already face discrimination to gain IDs or citizenship, this applies to communities such as the Somali and Nubian in Kenya.

In line with those observations, the court did give a green light to NIIMS stating that if it meets recommended actions by the court it can resume. According to the court, the threshold for public participation in huduma Namba registration was met and the public had enough time to present views against the petitioner’s argument that the 7 days given for public participation were not sufficient.

The court also stated that collection of data is only intrusive if it’s collected without the consent of the said individuals hence NIMS is not intrusive. However, the court has urged that Huduma Namba can only proceed if a number of requirements are met including the following:

  • Enactment of a comprehensive legal framework in line with the constitution that adheres to data privacy and protection is developed.
  • Mechanisms are in place to ensure NIIMS does not exclude any section of the Kenyan Population.

Image result for Digital ID africa

The court is set to release the official judgment documents during the course of the coming week for public viewing on each component/recommendation they made. Bernard an officer at the Kenyan Human Rights Commission stated that “It’s not the verdict we expected but it’s good progress” the key concern now is to see how the government will go about implementing the court’s orders in a manner that does not infringe on Kenyans rights. To a lot of other African Countries implementing Digital IDs, the Huduma Namba case has set a precedent on the importance of governments to put data protection and privacy at the core of the- implementation of digital ID systems. In line with this, it has highlighted the need for this process to have sufficient time to ensure frameworks developed meet public participation standards, is inclusive, rational and clearly thought through.

While there are still concerns on how this will work out, it’s important for legislators and government entities to look at NIIMS case as an important signal on how fast digital ID is taking up space but it shouldn’t be an excuse to carry out surveillance, deny rights and most of all deny services to the public. Paradigm Initiative commends the work done by the Nubian Forum, The Kenya Human Rights Commission and partners in pushing the judiciary to take its role in ensuring justice is served.

We also urge the Kenyan Government which passed the Data Protection and Privacy Bill last year November to hasten the establishment of the data protection commission to ensure that the machine starts rolling out soonest. The future is promising if African courts and governments can uphold rights hence we call upon governments to ensure that processes, policies, and laws adhere to human rights, affirms to protecting them and ensuring inclusivity.

The author of this articles,  Rebecca Ryakitimbo is Paradigm Initiative’s Digital Rights Program Officer for East Africa

 

fr_FRFrench
en_USEnglish fr_FRFrench